ML&DL Bootcamp Berlin- Recommender System

How To Build Recommender System With Machine Learning And Deep Learning

Do you know what is the most requested topic in machine learning and deep learning in Berlin? 

There are numerous e-commerce companies are based in Berlin, there are numerous job opening to hire data scientists to build a recommender system for their platform?

Learn how to build recommender systems from our trainer from London. Stylianos Kampakis spent over eight years at teaching, training coaching Data Science, Machine Learning and Deep Learning.

Automated recommendations are everywhere – on Netflix, Youtube, Zalando app and on Amazon. Machine Learning Algorithms learn about your unique interests and show the best products or content for you as an individual.

 

However, do you actually know how does the recommender system work? Do you know there are several ways to build a recommender system? Do you want to learn all of them? Recommender systems are complex, but it is for sure to be able to start in 1-2 days.

Learn a hands-on; you’ll develop your own framework for evaluating and combining many different recommendation algorithms together, and you’ll even build your own neural networks using Tensorflow to generate recommendations from real-world cases.

We’ll cover:

  • Building a recommendation engine
  • Evaluating recommender systems
  • Content-based filtering using item attributes
  • Neighborhood-based collaborative filtering with user-based, item-based, and KNN CF
  • Model-based methods including matrix factorization and SVD
  • Applying deep learning, AI, and artificial neural networks to recommendations
  • Real-world challenges and solutions with recommender systems
  • Case studies
  • Building hybrid, ensemble recommenders

Who should join? 

  • Software developers interested in applying machine learning and deep learning to product or content recommendations
  • Engineers working at, or interested in working at large e-commerce or web companies
  • Computer Scientists interested in the latest recommender system theory and research

How To Hire Data Scientist For Your Company?

A data scientist is someone who makes value out of data. Such a person proactively fetches information from various sources and analyzes it for a better understanding of how the business performs, and to build AI tools that automate certain processes within the company.

There are many definitions of this job, and it is sometimes mixed with the Big Data engineer occupation. A data scientist or engineer may be X% scientist, Y% software engineer, and Z% hacker, which is why the definition of the job becomes convoluted. The actual ratios vary depending on the skills required and type of job. Usually, it’s considered normal to bring people with different sets of skills into the data science team.

Data scientist duties typically include creating various machine learning-based tools or processes within the company, such as recommendation engines or automated lead scoring systems. People within this role should also be able to perform statistical analysis.

In this article, we present a sample data scientist job description, for you to adjust depending on your actual needs to create a perfect job advertisement, and to find the person that will help you get the answers you are looking for.

Data Scientist – Job Description and Template

Company Introduction

{{Write a short and catchy paragraph about your company. Make sure to provide information about the company culture, perks, and benefits. Mention office hours, remote working possibilities, and everything else you think to make your company interesting. Data scientists like to take challenges – anything that shows how the role could make an impact might help attract top talent.}}

Job Description

We are looking for a data scientist that will help us discover the information hidden in vast amounts of data, and help us make smarter decisions to deliver even better products. Your primary focus will be in applying data mining techniques, doing statistical analysis, and building high-quality prediction systems integrated with our products. {{Depending on your needs, you can write very specific requirements here, like: “automate scoring using machine learning techniques”, “build recommendation systems”, “improve and extend the features used by our existing classifier”, “develop internal A/B testing procedures”, “build system for automated fraud detection”, etc.}}

Responsibilities

  • Selecting features, building and optimizing classifiers using machine learning techniques
  • Data mining using state-of-the-art methods
  • Extending the company’s data with third-party sources of information when needed
  • Enhancing data collection procedures to include information that is relevant for building analytic systems
  • Processing, cleansing, and verifying the integrity of data used for analysis
  • Doing ad-hoc analysis and presenting results in a clear manner
  • Creating automated anomaly detection systems and constant tracking of its performance
  • {{Select from the above and add other responsibilities that are relevant}}

Skills and Qualifications

  • Excellent understanding of machine learning techniques and algorithms, such as k-NN, Naive Bayes, SVM, Decision Forests, etc.
  • Experience with common data science toolkits, such as R, Weka, NumPy, MatLab, etc {{depending on specific project requirements}}. Excellence in at least one of these is highly desirable
  • Great communication skills
  • Experience with data visualization tools, such as D3.js, GGplot, etc.
  • Proficiency in using query languages such as SQL, Hive, Pig {{actual list depends on what you are currently using in your company}}
  • Experience with NoSQL databases, such as MongoDB, Cassandra, HBase {{depending on project needs}}
  • Good applied statistics skills, such as distributions, statistical testing, regression, etc.
  • Good scripting and programming skills {{if you expect that the person in this role will integrate the solution within the base application, list any programming languages and core frameworks currently being used}}
  • Data-oriented personality
  • {{Mention any other technology that such a person is going to commonly work with within the organization}}
  • {{List education level or certification you require}}

What You Need to Know about Data Mining and Predictive Analytics

What You Need to Know about Data Mining and Predictive Analytics

 

Have you ever wondered how Netflix knew to suggest that new sci-fi comedy that’s now your go-to binge watch? How does the service keep making smash-hit original shows? It’s not because its programming team is really good at throwing darts at an idea board. Netflix seems to know you because it actually does.

Marketers are living in the world of big data. One of the greatest challenges they face isn’t getting information on consumers. Rather, it’s pulling something useful from those gigantic stores of data. Two methods of digging out useful insights are data mining and predictive analytics.

Data mining and predictive analytics are sometimes confused with each other or rolled together, but they are two distinct specialties. As you examine the big data your company collects, it’s important you understand the differences between data mining and predictive analytics, the unique benefits of each, and how using these methods together can help you provide the products and services your customers want.

What is data mining?

Much of what you do produces data. Did you use a loyalty card last time you went grocery shopping? You can bet the grocery store was eager to collect all the information it could about this specific trip and your buying habits. Your credit card company got in on the game, too. Then, after you put the groceries away and sat down to watch your new favorite sci-fi show on Netflix, the media giant was learning about you through data points.

What happens to all of this data? How do your grocery store, your credit card company, and Netflix use it to give you more personalized service? How do they use it to encourage you to buy more?

Data mining plays a key role in this process.

Investopedia has an excellent definition of data mining: It’s “a process used by companies to turn raw data into useful information. By using software to look for patterns in large batches of data, businesses can learn more about their customers and develop more effective marketing strategies.”

In other words, data alone is pretty useless, even if you have massive amounts of it. To make any sense of the data, you need a system of organizing it, and then searching for patterns and insights. That’s exactly what data mining does, and it’s important to understand some data mining techniques and how they work.

Data mining is all about organizing and interpreting data.

If you own an online clothing retail shop, you obviously need to understand your customers as well as possible so you can offer them the clothing choices they want. When customers log on to your site, you can use cookies to track their activities. You’ll see data points that may include:

  • What time they visited your site
  • What device they used to access your site
  • Which pages they visited
  • Which items they put into their shopping cart
  • Which items they purchased together
  • Whether they compared items
  • How often they come back to your site

This is only a fraction of what you can learn about a single person. Think about what you could learn from all the visitors who land on your site each day. Once you’ve captured all that information, it’s time to process and use it.

Step One: Data Warehouse

Unsurprisingly, the first step in the data mining process is collecting all of that information and electronically storing it in a data warehouse. A warehouse can exist on a company’s private server or on the cloud.

Step Two: Organization

There’s no way you can glean useful insights from unprocessed data. Many companies choose to hire a data scientist to create organizational rules for the data warehouse.

Step Three: Insights

With the right organization, you can use specialized software to begin identifying patterns and trends in your data. For example, you may discover that women aged 30 to 35 from Massachusetts are more likely to buy Product B if they first purchase Product A. It stands to reason that if someone in that demographic purchases Product A, you should create an algorithm on your site that encourages them to buy Product B as well.

Use data mining to get to know your customer

The more you know about your customers, the better you can serve them. Effective data mining allows you to:

  • Discover patterns in massive amounts of data that would be impossible for a human alone to comb through
  • Make better purchasing and pricing decisions
  • Market more effectively and more personally to consumers

The results of data mining are easy to predict. You save on costs, increase your ROI, and impress your happy, loyal customers. Here’s one more big benefit of data mining: It is essential for effective predictive analytics.

What is predictive analytics?

Data mining gives you the insights, but what are you going to do with this information? In many ways, predictive analytics is the logical continuation of data mining. Predictive analytics is the means by which a data scientist uses information, which is usually garnered from data mining, to develop a predictive score for a customer or for a certain event to occur.

Companies often use these predictive scores to:

  • Assign a consumer a lifetime value based on how much they are predicted to spend with a company
  • Determine the best next offer to a customer based on demographic information and past actions
  • Develop marketing models for future ad spends
  • Forecast future sales numbers

One good way to understand how predictive analytics works is through an event roughly 64% of Americans have faced: applying for a mortgage. Banks, understandably, don’t want to give mortgages to risky applicants who may default. Therefore, when potential homeowners come in to request a mortgage, they have to give the bank lots of information, including:

  • Current income
  • Employment status
  • Savings-to-debt ratio
  • Credit score

The bank uses this information to predict whether the applicant would be a low or high risk for a mortgage. It also uses the information to determine how much money and what interest rate it is willing to offer the applicant. Of course, banks will never be able to predict with perfect accuracy who will pay their mortgage and who will not. The 2007–2008 housing crisis demonstrated the fallibility of bad predictive models. However, strong predictive analytics can certainly improve decision-making and overall accuracy.

Predictive analytics works off of good, clean data.

How is Netflix so good at pinpointing the right show for you, and how does it decide which new shows to greenlight for its viewers? Good predictive modeling requires three important predictive analytics tools:

Data

The first ingredient for predictive analytics is good data. According to Thomas H. Davenport in the Harvard Business Review , “Lack of good data is the most common barrier to organizations seeking to employ predictive analytics.”

Statistical Analysis

Not just anyone can dive into mined data and figure out whether a grocery store should increase its order of Pop-Tarts by 25% for the third quarter. Many large companies hire data scientists to carefully comb the data and pull out correlations and predictions. This is most often done using a method called regression analysis.

Educated Assumptions

Every predictive analysis is undergirded by certain assumptions, which must be monitored and updated over time as trends and opinions change. One of the reasons banks were so willing to approve mortgages so often in the early 2000s, even for applicants with low income and poor credit, was because they operated under the assumption that housing prices always go up. As soon as housing prices started to sink and overstretched customers went underwater, defaults skyrocketed. This outcome can largely be blamed on basing decisions off unsupported assumptions.

Your company benefits from predictive analytics.

It’s invaluable to know what your customers are most likely to do, what they are most likely to want, and how much they’ll likely spend to get it. With the right information, predictive analytics can dramatically improve your marketing success by helping you to find the right audience at the right time at the right place with the right message.

Your recent Netflix binge of that recommended sci-fi show is proof that predictive analytics works.

How should you use data mining and predictive analytics?

Both data mining and predictive analytics deal with discovering secrets within big data, but don’t confuse these two different methodologies. The best way to understand how they differ is to remember that data mining uses software to search for patterns, while predictive analytics uses those patterns to make predictions and direct decisions.

In this way, data mining often functions as a stepping stone to effective predictive analytics. While data mining is passive and provides insights, predictive analytics is active and offers clear recommendations for action.

As a marketer, you need both as you navigate the world of big data. Yes, that avalanche of information can seem intimidating, but rather than running away, embrace it. Tools like data mining and predictive analytics can give you priceless insights into consumers, as well as into greater trends in your industry.

With the help of data mining and predictive analytics, you can save money, increase your ROI, and potentially convince your customers you’re a bit psychic — just like Netflix.

Check out our upcoming Machine Learning Bootcamp- Predictive Analytics on the 28th of November in Berlin.

Secure your spot NOW.  

 

About the Author:

Jessica Bennett  is a writer, editor, and novelist. Her clients span a number of industries, and she’s written blog posts, product descriptions, articles, white papers, and press releases— all in the name of inbound marketing. She’s proud to be Inbound Certified, but her VP of Morale, Avalon, doesn’t quite get what all the fuss is about. But he’s a rabbit, so you can’t really blame him.
The original post was from Salesforce. You can find it here.
data-driven PM

Data-Driven Product Management

Every product manager talks about data-driven product management but what is the real explanation of it?

Product decisions are used to be based on product managers/owners and C-Level executives’ desires and instincts. What is the main driver of these instincts; customer feedbacks, competitive market intelligence or digital analytics results? The answer should be all of them. In this article, I will try to explain crucial data sources and which metrics should be considered in these data sources to make right product decisions.

Successful products belong to customers more than product managers. But it doesn’t mean product managers should only rely on customers’ needs and demands. Sometimes even customers don’t know what they want and need. Product managers must validate their customer feedbacks with different data sources.

 

Adapted Innovation Engine Business Model to Product Management Framework

As stated in the chart, Product Management should consider the data from Market Research, CMI (Competitor Market Intelligence), Internal Feedbacks, Digital Analytics and Customers’ Feedbacks to make data-driven decisions and create a value-added information. Sounds easy but assessing the value of the information and tying them to product roadmap needs an effort. Let’s deep dive into them one by one, and I will try to explain how I am using this model in my product management efforts.

 

Check our trainer’s Taner Akcok’s article on Toward Data Science and Medium and apply our Data-Driven Product Management Bootcamp.

What Happens When You Hire a Data Scientist Without a Data Engineer? Guest Post by Vladislav Supalov

Hey Folks,
Vladislav‘s photo
I’m Vladislav! If you care about AI, machine learning, and data science, you should have heard of data engineering. If you haven’t, or would like to learn more – then this is *exactly* for you. Helping companies to make use of their data is a fascinating topic! I’ve spent quite a bit of time building MVP data pipelines and would like to help you avoid one of the worst mistakes you can make when starting out on a serious project.
Having solid data plumbing in place is pretty darn important if you want to work with company data without wasting time and money. The natural train of thoughts when people want to make use of data “the right way”, usually ends at “we should hire a data scientist”.
That’s a mistake in almost every case. You need to take care of data engineering before that. Here are a few of my favourite pieces of writing on the topic:

What Happens When You Hire a Data Scientist Without a Data Engineer

This one is brief but worth a read. The most important points made, is the wasted time and an observed high tendency for a data scientists who are not given the right tools to quit.
A complete story of getting an analytics team up and running within 500px. Samson did a lot of stuff right, which is admirable. Take note of the tech choices, Luigi, in particular, to get data into a data warehouse. A great example of a well-thought-out way to work with data. One of the major mistakes he points out: not putting enough effort into data evangelism.

Your Data Is Your Lifeblood — Set up the Analytics It Deserves

An utterly amazing interview, full of great advice. I especially love that he points out that you should take care of making both event and operational transaction data available. Only if you combine them, you have a complete picture.
A very long interview with the Head of BI at Stylight. Konstantin did an impressive job in his first year and shares a lot of insight. This is not exactly about data engineering but on the topic of giving a company access to data and how to approach it. One of the most important takeaways for me was his advice to secure a small win for as many people as possible in the company when starting out. There are a lot of low-hanging fruits and you get the best ROI and a lot of goodwill from making them available.
Hope you’ll get a lot of value from those articles! If you want to learn more about data engineering, data pipelines and the stuff I do, scroll to the bottom of the last article and subscribe to Beyond Machine and  Vladislav‘s mailing list.
MIE Summit

The founding story behind Beyond Machine (rebranded from M.I.E)

Beyond Machine (rebranded from M.I.E) was spawned from Lele and Irene constant frustration during the founding of their AI startups. In the end of 2015, they both left their jobs at rising mobile ad tech and product companies. Lele first started SoCrowd and pivoted to Deckard after 3 months. Irene wanted to tackle the challenges of visual recognition.

It quickly became apparent that there was a need for a more developed community an outlet for media around Machine Intelligence. After running a fruitful and inspiring Evening Summit, they decided to take Beyond Machine. to the next level, founding a media company.focus on the training, re-education, and networking in the field of AI and innovative technology. Irene decided to leave FindEssence, the first company she co-founded and push forward the growth of Beyond Machine.

 

Beyond Machine’s mission: To connect people in AI industry globally, bringing profound and engaging content and to start a conversation about job substitution issues.

The blurb of M.I.E Summit 2017:

M.I.E. Summit Berlin 2017 is the World’s first open-space machine intelligence summit, which will be held on the 20th of June 2017.

This event will give you the opportunity to learn, discuss and network with your peers in the MI field. Backdropped in one of Berlin’s most vibrant and artistic locations, break free from traditional conference rooms and share a drink in a typical Berliner Biergarten.

The M.I.E Summit Berlin 2017 will provide you with two in-depth event tracks (keynotes, workshops, and panels) as well as over 25 leading speakers and unparalleled networking opportunities.

 

Agenda is announced on the website